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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(10), 12110-12126; doi:10.3390/ijerph121012110

Residential Radon Exposure and Incidence of Childhood Lymphoma in Texas, 1995–2011

1
Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS BCM305, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2
Birth Defects Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Texas Department of State Health Services, MC 1964, P.O. Box 149347, Austin, TX 78714-9347, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Helena Solo-Gabriele and Alesia Ferguson
Received: 4 August 2015 / Revised: 11 September 2015 / Accepted: 21 September 2015 / Published: 25 September 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Children’s Exposure to Environmental Contaminants)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [741 KB, uploaded 28 September 2015]   |  

Abstract

There is warranted interest in assessing the association between residential radon exposure and the risk of childhood cancer. We sought to evaluate the association between residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma in Texas. The Texas Cancer Registry (n = 2147) provided case information for the period 1995–2011. Denominator data were obtained from the United States Census. Regional arithmetic mean radon concentrations were obtained from the Texas Indoor Radon Survey and linked to residence at diagnosis. Exposure was assessed categorically: ≤25th percentile (reference), >25th to ≤50th percentile, >50th to ≤75th percentile, and >75th percentile. Negative binomial regression generated adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We evaluated lymphoma overall and by subtype: Hodgkin (HL; n = 1248), Non-Hodgkin excluding Burkitt (non-BL NHL; n = 658), Burkitt (BL; n = 241), and Diffuse Large B-cell (DLBCL; n = 315). There was no evidence that residential radon exposure was positively associated with lymphoma overall, HL, or BL. Areas with radon concentrations >75th percentile had a marginal increase in DLBCL incidence (aIRR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.03–2.91). In one of the largest studies of residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma, we found little evidence to suggest a positive or negative association; an observation consistent with previous studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: childhood cancer; epidemiology; lymphoma; residential radon; Texas Cancer Registry childhood cancer; epidemiology; lymphoma; residential radon; Texas Cancer Registry
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Peckham, E.C.; Scheurer, M.E.; Danysh, H.E.; Lubega, J.; Langlois, P.H.; Lupo, P.J. Residential Radon Exposure and Incidence of Childhood Lymphoma in Texas, 1995–2011. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 12110-12126.

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