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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(1), 692-709; doi:10.3390/ijerph120100692

Reducing Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure of Preschool Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Class-Based Health Education and Smoking Cessation Counseling for Caregivers

1
Department of Social Medicine and Health Management, School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha 410078, Hunan, China
2
School of Nursing, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830000, Xinjiang, China
3
Academy of Inspection and Quarantine, Changsha 410004, Hunan, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Adriana Blanco Marquizo
Received: 4 December 2014 / Accepted: 6 January 2015 / Published: 13 January 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tobacco Control)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [753 KB, uploaded 13 January 2015]   |  

Abstract

Objectives: To assess counseling to caregivers and classroom health education interventions to reduce environmental tobacco smoke exposure of children aged 5–6 years in China. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial in two preschools in Changsha, China, 65 children aged 5–6 years old and their smoker caregivers (65) were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 33) and control (no intervention) groups (n = 32). In the intervention group, caregivers received self-help materials and smoking cessation counseling from a trained counselor, while their children were given classroom-based participatory health education. Children’s urinary cotinine level and the point prevalence of caregiver quitting were measured at baseline and after 6 months. Results: At the 6-month follow-up, children’s urinary cotinine was significantly lower (Z = –3.136; p = 0.002) and caregivers’ 7-day quit rate was significantly higher (34.4% versus 0%) (p < 0.001; adjusted OR = 1.13; 95% CI: 1.02–1.26) in the intervention than control group. Conclusions: Helping caregivers quitting smoke combined with classroom-based health education was effective in reducing children’s environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Larger-scale trials are warranted. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental tobacco smoke (ETS); young children; intervention; urinary cotinine environmental tobacco smoke (ETS); young children; intervention; urinary cotinine
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Wang, Y.; Huang, Z.; Yang, M.; Wang, F.; Xiao, S. Reducing Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure of Preschool Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Class-Based Health Education and Smoking Cessation Counseling for Caregivers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 692-709.

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