Next Article in Journal
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health in 2014
Previous Article in Journal
Brand Cigarillos — A Cheap and Less Harmful Alternative to Cigarettes? Particulate Matter Emissions Suggest Otherwise
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(1), 439-454; doi:10.3390/ijerph120100439

Association between Temperature Change and Outpatient Visits for Respiratory Tract Infections among Children in Guangzhou, China

1,2,†
,
1,2,†
,
3
,
1,2
,
1,2
,
1
,
1
,
1,2
and
1,2,*
1
Division of Birth Cohort Study, Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center, Sun Yat-sen University, 9 Jinsui Road, Guangzhou 510623, China
2
Department of Health Care, Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center, Sun Yat-sen University, 9 Jinsui Road, Guangzhou 510623, China
3
Central Laboratory, Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center, Sun Yat-sen University, 9 Jinsui Road, Guangzhou 510623, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 15 October 2014 / Accepted: 23 December 2014 / Published: 6 January 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1615 KB, uploaded 7 January 2015]   |  

Abstract

The current study examined the association between temperature change and clinical visits for childhood respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in Guangzhou, China. Outpatient records of clinical visits for pediatric RTIs, which occurred from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2013, were collected from Guangzhou Women and Children’s Hospital. Records for meteorological variables during the same period were obtained from the Guangzhou Meteorological Bureau. Temperature change was defined as the difference between the mean temperatures on two consecutive days. A distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) was used to examine the impact of temperature change on pediatric outpatient visits for RTIs. A large temperature decrease was associated with a significant risk for an RTI, with the effect lasting for ~10 days. The maximum effect of a temperature drop (−8.8 °C) was reached at lag 2~3 days. Children aged 0–2 years, and especially those aged <1 year, were particularly vulnerable to the effects of temperature drop. An extreme temperature decrease affected the number of patient visits for both upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). A temperature change between consecutive days, and particularly an extreme temperature decrease, was significantly associated with increased pediatric outpatient visits for RTIs in Guangzhou. View Full-Text
Keywords: temperature change; respiratory tract infections; outpatient visits; distributed lag non-linear model; children temperature change; respiratory tract infections; outpatient visits; distributed lag non-linear model; children
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, Y.; Guo, Y.; Wang, C.; Li, W.; Lu, J.; Shen, S.; Xia, H.; He, J.; Qiu, X. Association between Temperature Change and Outpatient Visits for Respiratory Tract Infections among Children in Guangzhou, China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 439-454.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top