Next Article in Journal
Evaluation of Immunomagnetic Separation for the Detection of Salmonella in Surface Waters by Polymerase Chain Reaction
Previous Article in Journal
Resampling Methods Improve the Predictive Power of Modeling in Class-Imbalanced Datasets
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(9), 9790-9810; doi:10.3390/ijerph110909790

Social and Physical Environmental Correlates of Adults’ Weekend Sitting Time and Moderating Effects of Retirement Status and Physical Health

1
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Movement and Sport Sciences, Ghent University, Watersportlaan 2, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
2
Research Foundation Flanders (FWO), Egmontstraat 5, 1000 Brussels, Belgium
3
Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Melbourne Burwood Campus, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood VIC 3125, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 6 June 2014 / Revised: 9 September 2014 / Accepted: 12 September 2014 / Published: 19 September 2014
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [315 KB, uploaded 19 September 2014]   |  

Abstract

Emerging research suggests that prolonged sedentary behaviour (SB) is detrimental to health. Changes in SB patterns are likely to occur during particular life stages, for example at retirement age (55–65-year-old). Evidence on socio-ecological SB correlates is scarce and inconsistent in this age group. Moreover, the influence of socio-ecological correlates may vary depending on health and retirement status. This study examined social and environment correlates of overall weekend day sitting among adults at or approaching retirement age, and moderating effects of perceived physical health and retirement status. Baseline data from the Wellbeing, Eating and Exercise for a Long Life study in 2839 Australian adults (55–65-year-old) were analysed. Participants self-reported proximal social factors, neighbourhood social and physical environment, physical health and retirement status. MLwiN multilevel regression analyses were conducted. In the multivariable model, only social support from friends/colleagues to discourage sitting (B = −0.891; p = 0.036) was associated with overall weekend day sitting. No moderation of retirement status, nor physical health were found in the multivariable results. Results from this study suggest the importance of social factors in relation to weekend day sitting among 55–65-year-old adults. Health promotion initiatives in this age group should pay special attention to enhancing social interaction opportunities. Moreover, findings suggest that SB-specific correlates may need to be examined in future research. View Full-Text
Keywords: sedentary behaviour; proximal social factors; social environment; physical environment; neighbourhood; retirement; health; ageing sedentary behaviour; proximal social factors; social environment; physical environment; neighbourhood; retirement; health; ageing
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Van Holle, V.; McNaughton, S.A.; Teychenne, M.; Timperio, A.; Van Dyck, D.; De Bourdeaudhuij, I.; Salmon, J. Social and Physical Environmental Correlates of Adults’ Weekend Sitting Time and Moderating Effects of Retirement Status and Physical Health. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 9790-9810.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top