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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(11), 11645-11663; doi:10.3390/ijerph111111645

Community-Based Lifestyle Intervention for Reducing Blood Pressure and Glucose among Middle-Aged and Older Adults in China: A Pilot Study

1
Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, No. 74 Zhongshan 2nd Road, Guangzhou 510080, China
2
Health Management Center, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, No. 123 Huifu Xi Road, Guangzhou 510180, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 July 2014 / Revised: 28 October 2014 / Accepted: 5 November 2014 / Published: 13 November 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Preventive Medicine)
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Abstract

Although evidence suggests that lifestyle interventions can reduce blood pressure (BP) and glucose levels, there is little information about the feasibility of such interventions when implemented in community settings. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a community-based lifestyle intervention on BP and glucose in the middle-aged and older Chinese population. By using a cluster randomisation approach, 474 participants from two communities were assigned to the intervention group which received intensive health education and behavioural intervention, or the control group which received conventional education. Linear mixed models were used to compare between-group differences on change in BP and fasting glucose after 6, 12 and 24 months. At the 12-month follow-up, the intervention group experienced significantly reductions in systolic BP (−4.9 vs. 2.4 mmHg; mean difference [MD] −7.3 mmHg; p < 0.001), diastolic BP (−1.9 vs. 1.9 mmHg; MD −3.8 mmHg; p < 0.001) and fasting glucose (−0.59 vs. 0.08 mmol/L; MD −0.67 mmol/L; p < 0.001). These differences were sustained at the 24-month follow-up. With only two communities, it was not possible to adjust for potential clustering by site. This approach of lifestyle interventions conducted through primary care services may be a potential solution for combating hypertension and diabetes in a resource-limited country context in China. View Full-Text
Keywords: hypertension; diabetes mellitus; lifestyle intervention; community; middle-aged and older adults; China hypertension; diabetes mellitus; lifestyle intervention; community; middle-aged and older adults; China
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Lin, A.; Zhang, G.; Liu, Z.; Gu, J.; Chen, W.; Luo, F. Community-Based Lifestyle Intervention for Reducing Blood Pressure and Glucose among Middle-Aged and Older Adults in China: A Pilot Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 11645-11663.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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