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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(11), 11028-11053; doi:10.3390/ijerph111111028

Perceived Adverse Health Effects of Heat and Their Determinants in Deprived Neighbourhoods: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Nine Cities in Canada

1
Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique Centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490, rue de la Couronne, QC G1K 9A9, Canada
2
Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, 945, Avenue Wolfe, QC G1V 5B3, Canada
3
Université Laval, 2325 rue de l'Université, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
4
Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, 2705, Boulevard Laurier, QC G1V 4G2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 July 2014 / Revised: 26 September 2014 / Accepted: 7 October 2014 / Published: 24 October 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extreme Weather-Related Morbidity and Mortality: Risks and Responses)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [705 KB, uploaded 27 October 2014]   |  

Abstract

This study identifies several characteristics of individuals who report their physical and/or mental health as being adversely affected by summertime heat and humidity, within the most disadvantaged neighbourhoods of the nine largest cities of Québec (Canada). The study is cross-sectional by stratified representative sample; 3485 people were interviewed in their residence. The prevalence of reported impacts was 46%, mostly physical health. Female gender and long-term medical leave are two impact risk indicators in people <65 years of age. Low income and air conditioning at home are risk indicators at all ages. Results for having ≥2 diagnoses of chronic diseases, particularly for people self-describing as in poor health (odds ratio, OR<65 = 5.6; OR≥65 = 4.2), and perceiving daily stress, are independent of age. The prevalence of reported heat-related health impacts is thus very high in those inner cities, with notable differences according to age, stress levels and long-term medical leave, previously unmentioned in the literature. Finally, the total number of pre-existing medical conditions seems to be a preponderant risk factor. This study complements the epidemiologic studies based on mortality or severe morbidity and shows that the heat-related burden of disease appears very important in those communities, affecting several subgroups differentially. View Full-Text
Keywords: heat waves; health impacts; deprived neighbourhoods; sex; long-term medical leave heat waves; health impacts; deprived neighbourhoods; sex; long-term medical leave
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Bélanger, D.; Gosselin, P.; Valois, P.; Abdous, B. Perceived Adverse Health Effects of Heat and Their Determinants in Deprived Neighbourhoods: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Nine Cities in Canada. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 11028-11053.

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