This is a reply to Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(7), 2732-2734.

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(7), 2735-2740; doi:10.3390/ijerph10072735
Reply

Response to Baverstock, K. Comments on Rithidech, K.N.; et al. Lack of Genomic Instability in Bone Marrow Cells of SCID Mice Exposed Whole-Body to Low-Dose Radiation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 1356–1377.

1 Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11974, USA 2 Department of Radiologic Technology, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Center of Excellence for Molecular Imaging, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand 3 Institute of Human Infections and Immunology, Galveston National Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 June 2013; Accepted: 19 June 2013 / Published: 2 July 2013
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Abstract: We thank Dr. Baverstock [1] for his interest in reading our article and his time in writing his comments for our work [2]. We, however, respectfully disagree with his statement that we made “two category errors” associated with the assessment of the occurrence of “genomic instability” by determining the frequencies of delayed- or late-occurring chromosomal damage. Our disagreement is based upon the well-known fact that radiation-induced genomic instability (or delayed/late-occurring damage) can be manifested in many ways. These include late-occurring chromosomal damage, or mutations, or gene expression, or gene amplifications, or transformation, or microsatellite instability, or cell killing [3–9]. Such phenomena have been detected many cell generations after irradiation. We agree that genomic instability may well be the consequence of epigenetic changes. Another mechanism mentioned by Dr. Bavertock as being probably unlikely is the reversibility of damage. This potential may not be discarded off-hand, as Dr. Baverstock prefers to do. There is much reproducible evidence of adaptive protection that depending on absorbed dose precisely may reverse early damage, and damage appearing late may be due to some form of residual damage letting the cell become genetically unstable. In other words, the argument by Dr. Baverstock regarding upward or downward causation appears to be rather speculative and far from being settled.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Rithidech, K.N.; Udomtanakunchai, C.; Honikel, L.; Whorton, E. Response to Baverstock, K. Comments on Rithidech, K.N.; et al. Lack of Genomic Instability in Bone Marrow Cells of SCID Mice Exposed Whole-Body to Low-Dose Radiation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 1356–1377.. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 2735-2740.

AMA Style

Rithidech KN, Udomtanakunchai C, Honikel L, Whorton E. Response to Baverstock, K. Comments on Rithidech, K.N.; et al. Lack of Genomic Instability in Bone Marrow Cells of SCID Mice Exposed Whole-Body to Low-Dose Radiation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 1356–1377.. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2013; 10(7):2735-2740.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rithidech, Kanokporn N.; Udomtanakunchai, Chatchanok; Honikel, Louise; Whorton, Elbert. 2013. "Response to Baverstock, K. Comments on Rithidech, K.N.; et al. Lack of Genomic Instability in Bone Marrow Cells of SCID Mice Exposed Whole-Body to Low-Dose Radiation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 1356–1377.." Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 10, no. 7: 2735-2740.

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