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Mar. Drugs, Volume 16, Issue 5 (May 2018)

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Cover Story (view full-size image) The purpose of this study is to change the paradigm based on the harvest/extraction approach and [...] Read more.
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Open AccessReview Molecular Targets of Active Anticancer Compounds Derived from Marine Sources
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 175; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050175
Received: 10 March 2018 / Revised: 14 May 2018 / Accepted: 17 May 2018 / Published: 22 May 2018
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Abstract
Over the past decades, a number of novel compounds, which are produced in the marine environment, have been found to exhibit the anticancer effects. This review focuses on molecular targets of marine-derived anticancer candidates in clinical and preclinical studies. They are kinases, transcription
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Over the past decades, a number of novel compounds, which are produced in the marine environment, have been found to exhibit the anticancer effects. This review focuses on molecular targets of marine-derived anticancer candidates in clinical and preclinical studies. They are kinases, transcription factors, histone deacetylase, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and so on. Specific emphasis of this review paper is to provide information on the optimization of new target compounds for future research and development of anticancer drugs, based on the identification of structures of these target molecules and parallel compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Drugs Interact with Functional Proteins)
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Open AccessArticle Bioactive Pyridone Alkaloids from a Deep-Sea-Derived Fungus Arthrinium sp. UJNMF0008
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050174
Received: 29 April 2018 / Revised: 15 May 2018 / Accepted: 18 May 2018 / Published: 22 May 2018
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Abstract
Eight new 4-hydroxy-2-pyridone alkaloids arthpyrones D–K (18), along with two known analogues apiosporamide (9) and arthpyrone B (10), were isolated from a deep-sea-derived fungus Arthrinium sp. UJNMF0008. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated
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Eight new 4-hydroxy-2-pyridone alkaloids arthpyrones D–K (18), along with two known analogues apiosporamide (9) and arthpyrone B (10), were isolated from a deep-sea-derived fungus Arthrinium sp. UJNMF0008. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods with that of 1 being established by chemical transformation and X-ray diffraction analysis. Compounds 1 and 2 bore an ester functionality linking the pyridone and decalin moieties first reported in this class of metabolites, while 3 and 4 incorporated a rare natural hexa- or tetrahydrobenzofuro[3,2-c]pyridin-3(2H)-one motif. Compounds 36 and 9 exhibited moderate to significant antibacterial activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis and Staphylococcus aureus with IC50 values ranging from 1.66–42.8 μM, while 9 displayed cytotoxicity against two human osteosarcoma cell lines (U2OS and MG63) with IC50 values of 19.3 and 11.7 μM, respectively. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Mono- and Dimeric Naphthalenones from the Marine-Derived Fungus Leptosphaerulina chartarum 3608
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 173; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050173
Received: 11 April 2018 / Revised: 8 May 2018 / Accepted: 11 May 2018 / Published: 21 May 2018
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Abstract
Five new naphthalenones, two enantiomers (−)-1 and (+)-1 leptothalenone A, (−)-4,8-dihydroxy-7-(2-hydroxy-ethyl)-6-methoxy-3,4-dihydro-2H-naphthalen-1-one ((−)-2), (4S, 10R, 4’S)-leptotha-lenone B (5), (4R, 10S, 4’S)-leptothalenone B (6
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Five new naphthalenones, two enantiomers (−)-1 and (+)-1 leptothalenone A, (−)-4,8-dihydroxy-7-(2-hydroxy-ethyl)-6-methoxy-3,4-dihydro-2H-naphthalen-1-one ((−)-2), (4S, 10R, 4’S)-leptotha-lenone B (5), (4R, 10S, 4’S)-leptothalenone B (6), and a new isocoumarine, 6-hydroxy-5,8-dimethoxy-3-methyl-1H-isochromen-1-one (4), along with two known compounds (+)-4,8-dihydroxy-7-(2-hydroxy-ethyl)-6-methoxy-3,4-dihydro-2H-naphthalen-1-one ((+)-2) and (+)-10-norparvulenone (3) were isolated from the marine-derived fungus Leptosphaerulina chartarum 3608. The structures of new compounds were elucidated by HR-ESIMS, NMR, and ECD analysis. All compounds were evaluated for cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory activity. Compound 6 showed moderate anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO) in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, with an IC50 value of 44.5 μM. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Anti-Tumorigenic and Anti-Metastatic Activity of the Sponge-Derived Marine Drugs Aeroplysinin-1 and Isofistularin-3 against Pheochromocytoma In Vitro
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050172
Received: 24 April 2018 / Revised: 12 May 2018 / Accepted: 15 May 2018 / Published: 20 May 2018
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Abstract
Over 10% of pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (PPGL) patients have malignant disease at their first presentation in the clinic. Development of malignancy and the underlying molecular pathways in PPGLs are poorly understood and efficient treatment strategies are missing. Marine sponges provide a natural source
[...] Read more.
Over 10% of pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (PPGL) patients have malignant disease at their first presentation in the clinic. Development of malignancy and the underlying molecular pathways in PPGLs are poorly understood and efficient treatment strategies are missing. Marine sponges provide a natural source of promising anti-tumorigenic and anti-metastatic agents. We evaluate the anti-tumorigenic and anti-metastatic potential of Aeroplysinin-1 and Isofistularin-3, two secondary metabolites isolated from the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba, on pheochromocytoma cells. Aeroplysinin-1 diminished the number of proliferating cells and reduced spheroid growth significantly. Beside these anti-tumorigenic activity, Aeroplysinin-1 decreased the migration ability of the cells significantly (p = 0.01), whereas, the invasion capacity was not affected. Aeroplysinin-1 diminished the high adhesion capacity of the MTT cells to collagen (p < 0.001) and, furthermore, reduced the ability to form spheroids significantly. Western Blot and qRT-PCR analysis showed a downregulation of integrin β1 that might explain the lower adhesion and migration capacity after Aeroplysinin-1 treatment. Isofistularin-3 showed only a negligible influence on proliferative and pro-metastatic cell properties. These in vitro investigations show promise for the application of the sponge-derived marine drug, Aeroplysinin-1 as anti-tumorigenic and anti-metastatic agent against PPGLs for the first time. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Marine Compounds and Cancer) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle Isolation and Composition Analysis of Bioactive Glycosaminoglycans from Whelk
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 171; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050171
Received: 5 March 2018 / Revised: 4 April 2018 / Accepted: 10 May 2018 / Published: 18 May 2018
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Abstract
Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are found covalently attached to proteins, which create conjugates known as proteoglycans. GAGs have remarkable biological activity as co-receptors for a variety of growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines. The present study identifies the key compositional differences between the GAGs isolated from
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Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are found covalently attached to proteins, which create conjugates known as proteoglycans. GAGs have remarkable biological activity as co-receptors for a variety of growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines. The present study identifies the key compositional differences between the GAGs isolated from whelk and mammalian GAGs. This polysaccharide represents a new, previously undescribed GAG with cytotoxic activity on cancer cells. Disaccharides were obtained by sample digestion with heparinases I, II, and III and chondroitinase ABC. The resistant oligosaccharides from whelk GAGs treated with heparinase I, II, and III and chondroitinase ABC were retained by the filter due to their larger size. Disaccharide analysis was performed using Glycan Reduction Isotope Labeling (GRIL LCQ-MS). The amounts of filter-retained fragments, as assessed by monosaccharides analysis, suggested that a proportion of the whelk GAG chains remained resistant to the enzymes used in the disaccharide analysis. Thus, the proportions of individual disaccharide produced in this analysis may not truly represent the overall proportions of disaccharide types within the intact whelk GAGs chain. However, they do serve as important descriptors for the classification and make-up of the anti-cancer GAGs chains. Furthermore, these data represent clear evidence of the compositional differences between whelk GAGs and commercial mammalian GAGs. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Glycosaminoglycans from a Sea Snake (Lapemis curtus): Extraction, Structural Characterization and Antioxidant Activity
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 170; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050170
Received: 10 April 2018 / Revised: 7 May 2018 / Accepted: 10 May 2018 / Published: 18 May 2018
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Abstract
Sea snakes have wide application prospects in medicine, health food and other fields. Several novel polysaccharides were successfully obtained from the skin and the meat of a sea snake (Lapemis curtus). The structures of polysaccharides LSP3 and LMP3, which were extracted
[...] Read more.
Sea snakes have wide application prospects in medicine, health food and other fields. Several novel polysaccharides were successfully obtained from the skin and the meat of a sea snake (Lapemis curtus). The structures of polysaccharides LSP3 and LMP3, which were extracted and purified from Lapemis curtus, were determined to be new and highly heterogenic glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) by means of FT-IR, ESI-MS/MS and NMR. LSP3 is a hybrid dermatan sulfate (DS) and composed of 48% 4-sulfated disaccharides (Di4S), 42% 6-sulfated disaccharides (Di6S) and 5% disulfated disaccharides (Di2,6S), while LMP3 is a hybrid chondroitin sulfate (CS) and composed of 70% Di4S, 20% Di6S, and 8% Di2,6S. More importantly, LSP3 and LMP3 showed a strong scavenging ability of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals, iron (Fe2+) chelating activity and total antioxidant capacity in vitro, especially LSP3, with high contents of uronic acid and sulfate, which possessed a higher scavenging ability of DPPH radicals than other fractions. These data suggested that the sea snake polysaccharides could be promising candidates for natural antioxidant ingredients. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Marine Polysaccharides) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle Characteristics of the Copper,Zinc Superoxide Dismutase of a Hadal Sea Cucumber (Paelopatides sp.) from the Mariana Trench
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 169; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050169
Received: 3 April 2018 / Revised: 11 May 2018 / Accepted: 15 May 2018 / Published: 18 May 2018
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Abstract
Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are among the most important antioxidant enzymes and show great potential in preventing adverse effects during therapeutic trials. In the present study, cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Ps-Cu,Zn-SOD) from a hadal sea cucumber (Paelopatides
[...] Read more.
Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are among the most important antioxidant enzymes and show great potential in preventing adverse effects during therapeutic trials. In the present study, cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Ps-Cu,Zn-SOD) from a hadal sea cucumber (Paelopatides sp.) were reported. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Ps-Cu,Zn-SOD belonged to a class of intracellular SOD. Its Km and Vmax were 0.0258 ± 0.0048 mM and 925.1816 ± 28.0430 units/mg, respectively. The low Km value of this enzyme represents a high substrate affinity and can adapt to the low metabolic rate of deep sea organisms. The enzyme functioned from 0 °C to 80 °C with an optimal temperature of 40 °C. Moreover, the enzyme activity was maintained up to 87.12% at 5 °C. The enzyme was active at pH 4 to 12 with an optimal pH of 8.5. Furthermore, Ps-Cu,Zn-SOD tolerated high concentration of urea and GuHCl, resisted hydrolysis by proteases, and maintained stability at high pressure. All these features demonstrated that the deep sea Ps-Cu,Zn-SOD is a potential candidate for application to the biopharmaceutical field. Full article
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Open AccessCommunication Precursor-Directed Generation of Indolocarbazoles with Topoisomerase IIα Inhibitory Activity
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 168; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050168
Received: 19 April 2018 / Revised: 7 May 2018 / Accepted: 11 May 2018 / Published: 17 May 2018
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Abstract
One new indolocarbazole, 3-hydroxy-K252d (3), together with the recently reported 3-hydroxyholyrine A (1) and 3′-N-acetyl-3-hydroxyholyrine A (2), were obtained by feeding a culture of the marine-derived Streptomyces strain OUCMDZ-3118 with 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan. Their structures
[...] Read more.
One new indolocarbazole, 3-hydroxy-K252d (3), together with the recently reported 3-hydroxyholyrine A (1) and 3′-N-acetyl-3-hydroxyholyrine A (2), were obtained by feeding a culture of the marine-derived Streptomyces strain OUCMDZ-3118 with 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. Compound 1 potently induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells by inhibiting topoisomerase IIα enzyme activity and reducing the expression of antiapoptosis protein level. Compound 3 displayed moderate cytotoxicity against the A549 and MCF-7 cell lines with IC50 values of 1.2 ± 0.05 μM, 1.6 ± 0.09 μM, respectively. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Dietary Polysaccharide from Enteromorpha Clathrata Modulates Gut Microbiota and Promotes the Growth of Akkermansia muciniphila, Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp.
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 167; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050167
Received: 24 April 2018 / Revised: 9 May 2018 / Accepted: 15 May 2018 / Published: 17 May 2018
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Abstract
Recently, accumulating evidence has suggested that Enteromorpha clathrata polysaccharide (ECP) could contribute to the treatment of diseases. However, as a promising candidate for marine drug development, although ECP has been extensively studied, less consideration has been given to exploring its effect on gut
[...] Read more.
Recently, accumulating evidence has suggested that Enteromorpha clathrata polysaccharide (ECP) could contribute to the treatment of diseases. However, as a promising candidate for marine drug development, although ECP has been extensively studied, less consideration has been given to exploring its effect on gut microbiota. In this light, given the critical role of gut microbiota in health and disease, we investigated here the effect of ECP on gut microbiota using 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing. As revealed by bioinformatic analyses, ECP considerably changed the structure of the gut microbiota and significantly promoted the growth of probiotic bacteria in C57BL/6J mice. However, interestingly, ECP exerted different effects on male and female microbiota. In females, ECP increased the abundances of Bifidobacterium spp. and Akkermansia muciniphila, a next-generation probiotic bacterium, whereas in males, ECP increased the population of Lactobacillus spp. Moreover, by shaping a more balanced structure of the microbiota, ECP remarkably reduced the antigen load from the gut in females. Altogether, our study demonstrates for the first time a prebiotic effect of ECP on gut microbiota and forms the basis for the development of ECP as a novel gut microbiota modulator for health promotion and disease management. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Marine Polysaccharides) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle Anticancer Activity of Euplotin C, Isolated from the Marine Ciliate Euplotes crassus, Against Human Melanoma Cells
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 166; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050166
Received: 24 April 2018 / Revised: 8 May 2018 / Accepted: 14 May 2018 / Published: 16 May 2018
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Abstract
Cutaneous melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer, so new cytotoxic weapons against novel targets in melanoma are of great interest. Euplotin C (EC), a cytotoxic secondary metabolite of the marine ciliate Euplotes crassus, was evaluated in the present study
[...] Read more.
Cutaneous melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer, so new cytotoxic weapons against novel targets in melanoma are of great interest. Euplotin C (EC), a cytotoxic secondary metabolite of the marine ciliate Euplotes crassus, was evaluated in the present study on human cutaneous melanoma cells to explore its anti-melanoma activity and to gain more insight into its mechanism of action. EC exerted a marked cytotoxic effect against three different human melanoma cell lines (A375, 501Mel and MeWo) with a potency about 30-fold higher than that observed in non-cancer cells (HDFa cells). A pro-apoptotic activity and a decrease in melanoma cell migration by EC were also observed. At the molecular level, the inhibition of the Erk and Akt pathways, which control many aspects of melanoma aggressiveness, was shown. EC cytotoxicity was antagonized by dantrolene, a ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonist, in a concentration-dependent manner. A role of RyR as a direct target of EC was also suggested by molecular modelling studies. In conclusion, our data provide the first evidence of the anti-melanoma activity of EC, suggesting it may be a promising new scaffold for the development of selective activators of RyR to be used for the treatment of melanoma and other cancer types. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Terpenoids from Marine Organisms)
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Open AccessReview Marine Microalgae with Anti-Cancer Properties
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 165; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050165
Received: 23 April 2018 / Revised: 4 May 2018 / Accepted: 12 May 2018 / Published: 15 May 2018
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Abstract
Cancer is the leading cause of death globally and finding new therapeutic agents for cancer treatment remains a major challenge in the pursuit for a cure. This paper presents an overview on microalgae with anti-cancer activities. Microalgae are eukaryotic unicellular plants that contribute
[...] Read more.
Cancer is the leading cause of death globally and finding new therapeutic agents for cancer treatment remains a major challenge in the pursuit for a cure. This paper presents an overview on microalgae with anti-cancer activities. Microalgae are eukaryotic unicellular plants that contribute up to 40% of global primary productivity. They are excellent sources of pigments, lipids, carotenoids, omega-3 fatty acids, polysaccharides, vitamins and other fine chemicals, and there is an increasing demand for their use as nutraceuticals and food supplements. Some microalgae are also reported as having anti-cancer activity. In this review, we report the microalgal species that have shown anti-cancer properties, the cancer cell lines affected by algae and the concentrations of compounds/extracts tested to induce arrest of cell growth. We also report the mediums used for growing microalgae that showed anti-cancer activity and compare the bioactivity of these microalgae with marine anticancer drugs already on the market and in phase III clinical trials. Finally, we discuss why some microalgae can be promising sources of anti-cancer compounds for future development. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Marine Compounds and Cancer) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle Structure of the Exopolysaccharide Secreted by a Marine Strain Vibrio alginolyticus
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050164
Received: 20 November 2017 / Revised: 9 May 2018 / Accepted: 10 May 2018 / Published: 15 May 2018
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Abstract
Vibrio alginolyticus (CNCM I-4151) secretes an exopolysaccharide whose carbohydrate backbone is decorated with amino acids, likely conferring its properties that are appreciated in cosmetics. Here, the secreted polysaccharide of another strain of V. alginolyticus (CNCM I-5034) was characterized by chromatography and one- and
[...] Read more.
Vibrio alginolyticus (CNCM I-4151) secretes an exopolysaccharide whose carbohydrate backbone is decorated with amino acids, likely conferring its properties that are appreciated in cosmetics. Here, the secreted polysaccharide of another strain of V. alginolyticus (CNCM I-5034) was characterized by chromatography and one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments. The structure was resolved and shows that the carbohydrate backbone is made of four residues: D-galactose (Gal), D-galacturonic acid (GalA) D-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and D-glucuronic acid (GlcA), forming a tetrasaccharide repetition unit [→4)-β-d-GlcA-(1→3)-α-d-Gal-(1→3)-α-d-GalA-(1→3)-β-GlcNAc(1→]. GlcA is derivatized with a lactate group giving ‘nosturonic acid’, and GalA is decorated with the amino acid alanine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Oligosaccharides and Polysaccharides)
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Open AccessArticle Characterization of Rhamnolipids Produced by an Arctic Marine Bacterium from the Pseudomonas fluorescence Group
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 163; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050163
Received: 10 April 2018 / Revised: 2 May 2018 / Accepted: 10 May 2018 / Published: 14 May 2018
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Abstract
The marine environment is a rich source of biodiversity, including microorganisms that have proven to be prolific producers of bioactive secondary metabolites. Arctic seas are less explored than warmer, more accessible areas, providing a promising starting point to search for novel bioactive compounds.
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The marine environment is a rich source of biodiversity, including microorganisms that have proven to be prolific producers of bioactive secondary metabolites. Arctic seas are less explored than warmer, more accessible areas, providing a promising starting point to search for novel bioactive compounds. In the present work, an Arctic marine Pseudomonas sp. belonging to the Pseudomonas (P.) fluorescence group was cultivated in four different media in an attempt to activate biosynthetic pathways leading to the production of antibacterial and anticancer compounds. Culture extracts were pre-fractionated and screened for antibacterial and anticancer activities. One fraction from three of the four growth conditions showed inhibitory activity towards bacteria and cancer cells. The active fractions were dereplicated using molecular networking based on MS/MS fragmentation data, indicating the presence of a cluster of related rhamnolipids. Six compounds were isolated using HPLC and mass-guided fractionation, and by interpreting data from NMR and high-resolution MS/MS analysis; the structures of the compounds were determined to be five mono-rhamnolipids and the lipid moiety of one of the rhamnolipids. Molecular networking proved to be a valuable tool for dereplication of these related compounds, and for the first time, five mono-rhamnolipids from a bacterium within the P. fluorescence group were characterized, including one new mono-rhamnolipid. Full article
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Open AccessReview Ascidian Toxins with Potential for Drug Development
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050162
Received: 7 April 2018 / Revised: 5 May 2018 / Accepted: 10 May 2018 / Published: 13 May 2018
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Abstract
Ascidians (tunicates) are invertebrate chordates, and prolific producers of a wide variety of biologically active secondary metabolites from cyclic peptides to aromatic alkaloids. Several of these compounds have properties which make them candidates for potential new drugs to treat diseases such as cancer.
[...] Read more.
Ascidians (tunicates) are invertebrate chordates, and prolific producers of a wide variety of biologically active secondary metabolites from cyclic peptides to aromatic alkaloids. Several of these compounds have properties which make them candidates for potential new drugs to treat diseases such as cancer. Many of these natural products are not produced by the ascidians themselves, rather by their associated symbionts. This review will focus mainly on the mechanism of action of important classes of cytotoxic molecules isolated from ascidians. These toxins affect DNA transcription, protein translation, drug efflux pumps, signaling pathways and the cytoskeleton. Two ascidian compounds have already found applications in the treatment of cancer and others are being investigated for their potential in cancer, neurodegenerative and other diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Invertebrate Toxins)
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Open AccessArticle Preparation, Physicochemical and Antioxidant Properties of Acid- and Pepsin-Soluble Collagens from the Swim Bladders of Miiuy Croaker (Miichthys miiuy)
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 161; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050161
Received: 1 April 2018 / Revised: 2 May 2018 / Accepted: 9 May 2018 / Published: 12 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3338 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Collagen is one of the most useful biomaterials and widely applied in functional food and cosmetics. However, some consumers have paid close attention to the safety of mammalian collagens because of the outbreaks of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), and other
[...] Read more.
Collagen is one of the most useful biomaterials and widely applied in functional food and cosmetics. However, some consumers have paid close attention to the safety of mammalian collagens because of the outbreaks of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), and other prion diseases. Therefore, there is a strong demand for developing alternative sources of collagen, with one promising source being from the process by-products of commercial fisheries. In this report, acid-soluble collagen (ASC-SB) and pepsin-soluble collagen (PSC-SB) from swim bladders of miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) were isolated with yields of 1.33 ± 0.11% and 8.37 ± 0.24% of dry swim bladder weight. Glycine was the major amino acid present, with a content of 320.5 (ASC-SB) and 333.6 residues/1000 residues (PSC-SB). ASC-SB and PSC-SB had much lower denaturation temperatures compared to mammalian collagen, a consequence of low imino acid contents (196.7 and 199.5 residues/1000 residues for ASC-SB and PSC-SB, respectively). The data of amino acid composition, SDS-PAGE pattern, UV and FTIR spectra confirmed that ASC-SB and PSC-SB were mainly composed of type I collagen. FTIR spectra data indicated there were more hydrogen bonding and intermolecular crosslinks in ASC-SB. These collagens showed high solubility in the acidic pH ranges and low NaCl concentrations (less than 2%). The Zeta potential values of ASC-SB and PSC-SB were 6.74 and 6.85, respectively. ASC-SB and PSC-SB presented irregular, dense, sheet-like films linked by random-coiled filaments under scanning electron microscopy. In addition, ASC-SB and PSC-SB could scavenge DPPH radical, hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion radical, and ABTS radical in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, the results indicate that collagens from the swim bladders of miiuy croaker are a viable substitute for mammalian collagen, with potential functional food and cosmeceutical applications. Full article
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