Next Article in Journal
Antitumor and Antimicrobial Potential of Bromoditerpenes Isolated from the Red Alga, Sphaerococcus coronopifolius
Next Article in Special Issue
Sulfated Steroid–Amino Acid Conjugates from the Irish Marine Sponge Polymastia boletiformis
Previous Article in Journal
Squid Pen Chitin Chitooligomers as Food Colorants Absorbers
Previous Article in Special Issue
Marine Peptides and Their Anti-Infective Activities
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Mar. Drugs 2015, 13(2), 697-712; doi:10.3390/md13020697

Sulphated Polysaccharides from Ulva clathrata and Cladosiphon okamuranus Seaweeds both Inhibit Viral Attachment/Entry and Cell-Cell Fusion, in NDV Infection

1
Laboratorio de Inmunología y Virología, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Av. Manuel L. Barragán y Av. Pedro de Alba s/n Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, N.L. 66455, Mexico
2
Centre d’Etude et de Valorisation des Algues, Presqu'île de Pen Lan, 22610 Pleubian, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Miguel O. Mitchell
Received: 31 October 2014 / Accepted: 6 January 2015 / Published: 26 January 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Anti-infective Agents)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [816 KB, uploaded 24 February 2015]   |  

Abstract

Sulphated polysaccharides (SP) extracted from seaweeds have antiviral properties and are much less cytotoxic than conventional drugs, but little is known about their mode of action. Combination antiviral chemotherapy may offer advantages over single agent therapy, increasing efficiency, potency and delaying the emergence of resistant virus. The paramyxoviridae family includes pathogens causing morbidity and mortality worldwide in humans and animals, such as the Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in poultry. This study aims at determining the antiviral activity and mechanism of action in vitro of an ulvan (SP from the green seaweed Ulva clathrata), and of its mixture with a fucoidan (SP from Cladosiphon okamuranus), against La Sota NDV strain. The ulvan antiviral activity was tested using syncytia formation, exhibiting an IC50 of 0.1 μg/mL; ulvan had a better anti cell-cell spread effect than that previously shown for fucoidan, and inhibited cell-cell fusion via a direct effect on the F0 protein, but did not show any virucidal effect. The mixture of ulvan and fucoidan showed a greater anti-spread effect than SPs alone, but ulvan antagonizes the effect of fucoidan on the viral attachment/entry. Both SPs may be promising antivirals against paramyxovirus infection but their mixture has no clear synergistic advantage. View Full-Text
Keywords: antiviral; seaweeds; sulphated polysaccharides; Ulva clathrata; Cladosiphon okamuranus; Newcastle Disease Virus antiviral; seaweeds; sulphated polysaccharides; Ulva clathrata; Cladosiphon okamuranus; Newcastle Disease Virus
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Aguilar-Briseño, J.A.; Cruz-Suarez, L.E.; Sassi, J.-F.; Ricque-Marie, D.; Zapata-Benavides, P.; Mendoza-Gamboa, E.; Rodríguez-Padilla, C.; Trejo-Avila, L.M. Sulphated Polysaccharides from Ulva clathrata and Cladosiphon okamuranus Seaweeds both Inhibit Viral Attachment/Entry and Cell-Cell Fusion, in NDV Infection. Mar. Drugs 2015, 13, 697-712.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Mar. Drugs EISSN 1660-3397 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top