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Mar. Drugs 2015, 13(2), 1071-1083; doi:10.3390/md13021071

Fish Oil N-3 Fatty Acids Increase Adiponectin and Decrease Leptin Levels in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

1
Department of Pathology, Clinical Analysis and Toxicology, Rua Robert Koch, University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná 86038-440, Brazil
2
Post Graduate Program in Health Sciences, Rua Robert Koch, University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná 86038-440, Brazil
3
Post Graduate Program in Pathology, Rua Robert Koch, University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná 86038-440, Brazil
4
Laboratory of Pathophysiology of Free Radicals, Rua Robert Koch, University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná 86038-440, Brazil
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Rua Robert Koch, University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná 86038-440, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Constantina Nasopoulou
Received: 20 November 2014 / Revised: 26 January 2015 / Accepted: 28 January 2015 / Published: 16 February 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Functional Food Products - Cardiovascular Diseases)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [522 KB, uploaded 24 February 2015]   |  

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has emerged as an important cause of death in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Reduced adiponectin and elevated leptin levels may contribute to CVD in SLE patients. The purpose of this study was to verify the effects of fish oil (FO) on adiponectin and leptin in patients with SLE. Biochemical and disease activity analysis were performed. Patients with SLE were divided in two groups: patients who used fish oil for four months and patients who did not use fish oil. Patients with SLE who used FO had a significant decrease in SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) score (p ˂ 0.023) in relation to baseline. SLE patients who used fish oil had increased adiponectin levels (p ˂ 0.026) and decreased leptin levels (p ˂ 0.024) compared to baseline values, whereas there were no differences in adiponectin and leptin levels in patients with SLE who did not use fish oil. In conclusion, the findings of increased serum adiponectin an decreased leptin levels after 120 days in the fish oil group, reinforce the importance of evaluating prospective studies of fish and fish oil fish ingestion on these adipokines in an attempt to decrease cardiovascular risk factors in patients with SLE. View Full-Text
Keywords: systemic lupus erythematosus; fish oil; adiponectin; leptin; cardiovascular risk systemic lupus erythematosus; fish oil; adiponectin; leptin; cardiovascular risk
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Lozovoy, M.A.B.; Simão, A.N.C.; Morimoto, H.K.; Scavuzzi, B.M.; Iriyoda, T.V.M.; Reiche, E.M.V.; Cecchini, R.; Dichi, I. Fish Oil N-3 Fatty Acids Increase Adiponectin and Decrease Leptin Levels in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Mar. Drugs 2015, 13, 1071-1083.

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