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Sensors 2009, 9(11), 9275-9299; doi:10.3390/s91109275

Tiny Medicine: Nanomaterial-Based Biosensors

1
Nanoworld and Smart Materials and Devices Laboratory, College of Engineering, University of Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA
2
Davis Heart & Lung Research Inst, Biomedical Engineering Dept. The Ohio State University, OH, 43210, USA
3
Environmental Health, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, OH, 45267, USA
4
Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA
5
BioMEMS Lab, College of Engineering, University of Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA
6
College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, OH, 43210, USA
7
Nanoworld and Smart Materials and Devices Laboratory, College of Engineering, University of Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA
8
BioMEMS Lab, College of Engineering, University of Cincinnati, OH, 45221, USA
9
University of Cincinnati, Bone Health and Osteoporosis Center, College of Medicine, OH, 45221, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 October 2009 / Revised: 3 November 2009 / Accepted: 9 November 2009 / Published: 19 November 2009
(This article belongs to the Section Biosensors)
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Abstract

Tiny medicine refers to the development of small easy to use devices that can help in the early diagnosis and treatment of disease. Early diagnosis is the key to successfully treating many diseases. Nanomaterial-based biosensors utilize the unique properties of biological and physical nanomaterials to recognize a target molecule and effect transduction of an electronic signal. In general, the advantages of nanomaterial-based biosensors are fast response, small size, high sensitivity, and portability compared to existing large electrodes and sensors. Systems integration is the core technology that enables tiny medicine. Integration of nanomaterials, microfluidics, automatic samplers, and transduction devices on a single chip provides many advantages for point of care devices such as biosensors. Biosensors are also being used as new analytical tools to study medicine. Thus this paper reviews how nanomaterials can be used to build biosensors and how these biosensors can help now and in the future to detect disease and monitor therapies. View Full-Text
Keywords: tiny medicine; nanomaterials; point of care tiny medicine; nanomaterials; point of care
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Yun, Y.-H.; Eteshola, E.; Bhattacharya, A.; Dong, Z.; Shim, J.-S.; Conforti, L.; Kim, D.; Schulz, M.J.; Ahn, C.H.; Watts, N. Tiny Medicine: Nanomaterial-Based Biosensors. Sensors 2009, 9, 9275-9299.

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