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Sensors 2003, 3(9), 381-392; doi:10.3390/s30900381

Chemical Sensors – from Molecules, Complex Mixtures to Cells – Supramolecular Imprinting Strategies

Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Vienna University, Waehringer Strasse 38, A-1090 Vienna, Austria
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Received: 11 August 2003 / Accepted: 28 August 2003 / Published: 11 September 2003
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Abstract

Methods of modern chemistry are a powerful tool in generating functional materials suitable as chemically sensitive layers to be combined with a variety of transducer principles. Molecular pits in polymers are formed by molecular imprinting, by suitable double-imprinting e.g. PAHs can be detected down to the sub-μg/l level. The resulting selectivity patterns depend both on the polymerization temperature and the template/mononomer composition. Organic contaminants in water can be either directly assessed in liquid phase or separated from the matrix by a porous Teflon membrane. Thus the detection limits can be reduced to the ppm-level due to the a much lower noise level in gaseous phase. Even complex processes such as engine oil degradation can be followed by suitably imprinted polymers. Pits on the nm- to μm scale are reached by surface templating polymers with microorganisms. The resulting layers show reversible, antibody-like interactions and thus are optimal sensor layers. The successful on-line detection of tobacco mosaic viruses (TMV) can be achieved by these surface imprinted layers. View Full-Text
Keywords: Molecular imprinting; self-assembly; PAH detection; solvent detection; engine oil degradation measurements; virus detection Molecular imprinting; self-assembly; PAH detection; solvent detection; engine oil degradation measurements; virus detection
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dickert, F.L.; Lieberzeit, P.A.; Hayden, O.; Gazda-Miarecka, S.; Halikias, K.; Mann, K.J.; Palfinger, C. Chemical Sensors – from Molecules, Complex Mixtures to Cells – Supramolecular Imprinting Strategies. Sensors 2003, 3, 381-392.

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