Next Article in Journal
Research on the Additional Secondary Phase Factor for Automatic Identification System Signals Transmitted over a Rough Sea Surface
Previous Article in Journal
Evaluating the Influence of Chromatic and Luminance Stimuli on SSVEPs from Behind-the-Ears and Occipital Areas
Article Menu
Issue 2 (February) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sensors 2018, 18(2), 616; doi:10.3390/s18020616

Sensor-Based Assessment of Soil Salinity during the First Years of Transition from Flood to Sprinkler Irrigation

Unidad de Suelos y Riegos (Associated to CSIC), Av. Montañana 930, 50059 Zaragoza, Spain
Estación Experimental de Aula Dei, CSIC, Av. Montañana 1005, 50059 Zaragoza, Spain
Laboratorio Agroambiental, Gobierno de Aragón, Av. Montañana 1005, 50059 Zaragoza, Spain
Department of Plant and Soil Science, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-2122, USA
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 November 2017 / Revised: 6 February 2018 / Accepted: 14 February 2018 / Published: 17 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Remote Sensors)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3796 KB, uploaded 22 February 2018]   |  


A key issue for agriculture in irrigated arid lands is the control of soil salinity, and this is one of the goals for irrigated districts when changing from flood to sprinkling irrigation. We combined soil sampling, proximal electromagnetic induction, and satellite data to appraise how soil salinity and its distribution along a previously flood-irrigated field evolved after its transformation to sprinkling. We also show that the relationship between NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index) and ECe (electrical conductivity of the soil saturation extracts) mimics the production function between yield and soil salinity. Under sprinkling, the field had a double crop of barley and then sunflower in 2009 and 2011. In both years, about 50% of the soil of the entire studied field—45 ha—had ECe < 8 dS m−1, i.e., allowing barley cultivation, while the percent of surface having ECe ≥ 16 dS m−1 increased from 8.4% in 2009 to 13.7% in 2011. Our methodology may help monitor the soil salinity oscillations associated with irrigation management. After quantifying and mapping the soil salinity in 2009 and 2011, we show that barley was stunted in places of the field where salinity was higher. Additionally, the areas of salinity persisted after the subsequent alfalfa cropping in 2013. Application of differential doses of water to the saline patches is a viable method to optimize irrigation water distribution and lessen soil salinity in sprinkler-irrigated agriculture. View Full-Text
Keywords: barley; electromagnetic induction sensor; remote sensing; NDVI barley; electromagnetic induction sensor; remote sensing; NDVI

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Casterad, M.A.; Herrero, J.; Betrán, J.A.; Ritchie, G. Sensor-Based Assessment of Soil Salinity during the First Years of Transition from Flood to Sprinkler Irrigation. Sensors 2018, 18, 616.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics



[Return to top]
Sensors EISSN 1424-8220 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top