Next Article in Journal
Effect of Composition and Thickness on the Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy of (Co/Pd) Multilayers
Next Article in Special Issue
GelSight: High-Resolution Robot Tactile Sensors for Estimating Geometry and Force
Previous Article in Journal
On-Tree Mango Fruit Size Estimation Using RGB-D Images
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Portable Stiffness Measurement System
Article Menu
Issue 12 (December) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sensors 2017, 17(12), 2748; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17122748

Tactile Perception of Roughness and Hardness to Discriminate Materials by Friction-Induced Vibration

Key Laboratory of Micro-Systems and Micro-Structures Manufacturing, Ministry of Education and School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 September 2017 / Revised: 3 November 2017 / Accepted: 22 November 2017 / Published: 28 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tactile Sensors and Sensing)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2687 KB, uploaded 28 November 2017]   |  

Abstract

The human fingertip is an exquisitely powerful bio-tactile sensor in perceiving different materials based on various highly-sensitive mechanoreceptors distributed all over the skin. The tactile perception of surface roughness and material hardness can be estimated by skin vibrations generated during a fingertip stroking of a surface instead of being maintained in a static position. Moreover, reciprocating sliding with increasing velocities and pressures are two common behaviors in humans to discriminate different materials, but the question remains as to what the correlation of the sliding velocity and normal load on the tactile perceptions of surface roughness and hardness is for material discrimination. In order to investigate this correlation, a finger-inspired crossed-I beam structure tactile tester has been designed to mimic the anthropic tactile discrimination behaviors. A novel method of characterizing the fast Fourier transform integral (FFT) slope of the vibration acceleration signal generated from fingertip rubbing on surfaces at increasing sliding velocity and normal load, respectively, are defined as kv and kw, and is proposed to discriminate the surface roughness and hardness of different materials. Over eight types of materials were tested, and they proved the capability and advantages of this high tactile-discriminating method. Our study may find applications in investigating humanoid robot perceptual abilities. View Full-Text
Keywords: tactile perception; materials discrimination; tactile sensor; friction induced vibration; surface roughness; hardness tactile perception; materials discrimination; tactile sensor; friction induced vibration; surface roughness; hardness
Figures

Graphical abstract

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Ding, S.; Pan, Y.; Tong, M.; Zhao, X. Tactile Perception of Roughness and Hardness to Discriminate Materials by Friction-Induced Vibration. Sensors 2017, 17, 2748.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sensors EISSN 1424-8220 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top