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Sensors 2016, 16(8), 1310; doi:10.3390/s16081310

Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring

1
Centre for Vision Research, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada
2
Great Lakes Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, 1219 Queen Street East, Sault Ste Marie, ON P6A 2E5, Canada
3
Flight Research Lab, National Research Council of Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, M-3, Ottawa, ON K1A 0R6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ingolf Willms
Received: 19 April 2016 / Revised: 29 June 2016 / Accepted: 10 August 2016 / Published: 18 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Fire Detection)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1992 KB, uploaded 18 August 2016]   |  

Abstract

For decades detection and monitoring of forest and other wildland fires has relied heavily on aircraft (and satellites). Technical advances and improved affordability of both sensors and sensor platforms promise to revolutionize the way aircraft detect, monitor and help suppress wildfires. Sensor systems like hyperspectral cameras, image intensifiers and thermal cameras that have previously been limited in use due to cost or technology considerations are now becoming widely available and affordable. Similarly, new airborne sensor platforms, particularly small, unmanned aircraft or drones, are enabling new applications for airborne fire sensing. In this review we outline the state of the art in direct, semi-automated and automated fire detection from both manned and unmanned aerial platforms. We discuss the operational constraints and opportunities provided by these sensor systems including a discussion of the objective evaluation of these systems in a realistic context. View Full-Text
Keywords: wildfire; fire detection; fire monitoring; airborne sensors; fire spotting; detection patrols; unmanned aerial vehicles wildfire; fire detection; fire monitoring; airborne sensors; fire spotting; detection patrols; unmanned aerial vehicles
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Allison, R.S.; Johnston, J.M.; Craig, G.; Jennings, S. Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring. Sensors 2016, 16, 1310.

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