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Sensors 2015, 15(4), 9466-9480; doi:10.3390/s150409466

Stability of the Nine Sky Quality Meters in the Dutch Night Sky Brightness Monitoring Network

1
National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, A. van Leeuwenhoeklaan 9, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands
2
Lumineux Consult, Landgraafstraat 96, 6845 ED Arnhem, The Netherlands
3
Sotto le Stelle, Merwedeplantsoen 27, 3522 JS Utrecht, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ki-Hyun Kim
Received: 18 December 2014 / Revised: 15 April 2015 / Accepted: 16 April 2015 / Published: 22 April 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modern Technologies for Sensing Pollution in Air, Water, and Soil)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2325 KB, uploaded 22 April 2015]   |  

Abstract

In the context of monitoring abundance of artificial light at night, the year-to-year stability of Sky Quality Meters (SQMs) is investigated by analysing intercalibrations derived from two measurement campaigns that were held in 2011 and 2012. An intercalibration comprises a light sensitivity factor and an offset for each SQM. The campaigns were concerned with monitoring measurements, each lasting one month. Nine SQMs, together forming the Night Sky Brightness Monitoring network (MHN) in The Netherlands, were involved in both campaigns. The stability of the intercalibration of these instruments leads to a year-to-year uncertainty (standard deviation) of 5% in the measured median luminance occurring at the MHN monitoring locations. For the 10-percentiles and 90-percentiles, we find 8% and 4%, respectively. This means that, for urban and industrial areas, changes in the sky brightness larger than 5% become detectable. Rural and nature areas require an 8%–9% change of the median luminance to be detectable. The light sensitivety agrees within 8% for the whole group of SQMs. View Full-Text
Keywords: artificial lighting; inter-comparison; inter-calibration; light pollution; night sky brightness; Sky Quality Meter artificial lighting; inter-comparison; inter-calibration; light pollution; night sky brightness; Sky Quality Meter
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

den Outer, P.; Lolkema, D.; Haaima, M.; van der Hoff, R.; Spoelstra, H.; Schmidt, W. Stability of the Nine Sky Quality Meters in the Dutch Night Sky Brightness Monitoring Network. Sensors 2015, 15, 9466-9480.

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