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Sensors 2015, 15(11), 29618-29634; doi:10.3390/s151129618

Particle Fabrication Using Inkjet Printing onto Hydrophobic Surfaces for Optimization and Calibration of Trace Contraband Detection Sensors

National Institute of Standards and Technology, Materials Measurement Laboratory, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Vittorio M. N. Passaro
Received: 4 September 2015 / Revised: 16 November 2015 / Accepted: 18 November 2015 / Published: 24 November 2015
(This article belongs to the Section Physical Sensors)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2793 KB, uploaded 24 November 2015]   |  

Abstract

A method has been developed to fabricate patterned arrays of micrometer-sized monodisperse solid particles of ammonium nitrate on hydrophobic silicon surfaces using inkjet printing. The method relies on dispensing one or more microdrops of a concentrated aqueous ammonium nitrate solution from a drop-on-demand (DOD) inkjet printer at specific locations on a silicon substrate rendered hydrophobic by a perfluorodecytrichlorosilane monolayer coating. The deposited liquid droplets form into the shape of a spherical shaped cap; during the evaporation process, a deposited liquid droplet maintains this geometry until it forms a solid micrometer sized particle. Arrays of solid particles are obtained by sequential translation of the printer stage. The use of DOD inkjet printing for fabrication of discrete particle arrays allows for precise control of particle characteristics (mass, diameter and height), as well as the particle number and spatial distribution on the substrate. The final mass of an individual particle is precisely determined by using gravimetric measurement of the average mass of solution ejected per microdrop. The primary application of this method is fabrication of test materials for the evaluation of spatially-resolved optical and mass spectrometry based sensors used for detecting particle residues of contraband materials, such as explosives or narcotics. View Full-Text
Keywords: inkjet printing; drop-on-demand; particle fabrication; sample preparation; hydrophobic silicon, trace detection inkjet printing; drop-on-demand; particle fabrication; sample preparation; hydrophobic silicon, trace detection
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Gillen, G.; Najarro, M.; Wight, S.; Walker, M.; Verkouteren, J.; Windsor, E.; Barr, T.; Staymates, M.; Urbas, A. Particle Fabrication Using Inkjet Printing onto Hydrophobic Surfaces for Optimization and Calibration of Trace Contraband Detection Sensors. Sensors 2015, 15, 29618-29634.

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