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Diversity, Volume 2, Issue 8 (August 2010), Pages 1048-1084

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Research

Open AccessArticle The Role of Volunteering in an Era of Cultural Transition: Can It Provide a Role Identity for Older People from Asian Cultures?
Diversity 2010, 2(8), 1048-1058; doi:10.3390/d2081048
Received: 21 June 2010 / Revised: 25 July 2010 / Accepted: 27 July 2010 / Published: 29 July 2010
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (123 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In western countries, one of the challenges facing ageing populations is an absence of social roles. One response to this is to volunteer, with evidence suggesting that this assigns meaning to the lives of older people and enhances health and well-being. This [...] Read more.
In western countries, one of the challenges facing ageing populations is an absence of social roles. One response to this is to volunteer, with evidence suggesting that this assigns meaning to the lives of older people and enhances health and well-being. This holds potential significance for older people from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and particularly those from Asian cultures, where there is evidence that cultural erosion is diminishing older people’s traditional roles. However, while volunteering can create role identities for older people, it may also further challenge existing cultural values. This paper debates these issues, drawing on a growing body of evidence relating to volunteering within Asian cultures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Pluralism)
Open AccessArticle Cultural Diversity as a Concept of Global Law: Origins, Evolution and Prospects
Diversity 2010, 2(8), 1059-1084; doi:10.3390/d2081059
Received: 25 June 2010 / Revised: 22 July 2010 / Accepted: 23 July 2010 / Published: 5 August 2010
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (119 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
“Cultural diversity” has become one of the latest buzzwords on the international policymaking scene. It is employed in various contexts—sometimes as a term close to “biological diversity”, at other times as correlated to the “exception culturelle” and most often, as a generic [...] Read more.
“Cultural diversity” has become one of the latest buzzwords on the international policymaking scene. It is employed in various contexts—sometimes as a term close to “biological diversity”, at other times as correlated to the “exception culturelle” and most often, as a generic concept that is mobilised to counter the perceived negative effects of economic globalisation. While no one has yet provided a precise definition of what cultural diversity is, what we can observe is the emergence of the notion of cultural diversity as incorporating a distinct set of policy objectives and choices at the global level. These decisions are not confined, as one might have expected, to cultural policymaking, but rather spill over to multiple governance domains because of the complex linkages inherent to the simultaneous pursuit of economic and other societal goals that cultural diversity encompasses and has effects on. Accounting for these intricate interdependencies, the present article clarifies the origins of the concept of cultural diversity as understood in global law and traces its evolution over time. Observing the dynamics of the concept and the surrounding political and legal developments in particular in the context of trade and culture, the article explores its justification and overall impact on the global legal regime, as well as its discrete effects on different domains of policymaking, such as media and intellectual property. While the analysis is legal in essence, the article is also meant to speak to a broader transdisciplinary public. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Pluralism)

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