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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(8), 1772; doi:10.3390/ijms18081772

Imaging Collagen in Scar Tissue: Developments in Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy for Biomedical Applications

1
Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6Z 1Y6, Canada
2
Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6Z 1Y6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 26 June 2017 / Revised: 9 August 2017 / Accepted: 10 August 2017 / Published: 15 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Scar Biology)
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Abstract

The ability to respond to injury with tissue repair is a fundamental property of all multicellular organisms. The extracellular matrix (ECM), composed of fibrillar collagens as well as a number of other components is dis-regulated during repair in many organs. In many tissues, scaring results when the balance is lost between ECM synthesis and degradation. Investigating what disrupts this balance and what effect this can have on tissue function remains an active area of research. Recent advances in the imaging of fibrillar collagen using second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging have proven useful in enhancing our understanding of the supramolecular changes that occur during scar formation and disease progression. Here, we review the physical properties of SHG, and the current nonlinear optical microscopy imaging (NLOM) systems that are used for SHG imaging. We provide an extensive review of studies that have used SHG in skin, lung, cardiovascular, tendon and ligaments, and eye tissue to understand alterations in fibrillar collagens in scar tissue. Lastly, we review the current methods of image analysis that are used to extract important information about the role of fibrillar collagens in scar formation. View Full-Text
Keywords: second harmonic generation; nonlinear optical microscopy; scar tissue; fibrillar collagen; skin; lung; vessels; image analysis second harmonic generation; nonlinear optical microscopy; scar tissue; fibrillar collagen; skin; lung; vessels; image analysis
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Mostaço-Guidolin, L.; Rosin, N.L.; Hackett, T.-L. Imaging Collagen in Scar Tissue: Developments in Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy for Biomedical Applications. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18, 1772.

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