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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(8), 1693; doi:10.3390/ijms18081693

Ghrelin Therapy Decreases Incidents of Intracranial Hemorrhage in Mice after Whole-Body Ionizing Irradiation Combined with Burn Trauma

1
Radiation Combined Injury Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA
2
Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Therapeutics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA
3
Department of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 19 June 2017 / Revised: 17 July 2017 / Accepted: 27 July 2017 / Published: 3 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurobiological Perspectives on Ghrelin)
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Abstract

Nuclear industrial accidents and the detonation of nuclear devices cause a variety of damaging factors which, when their impacts are combined, produce complicated injuries challenging for medical treatment. Thus, trauma following acute ionizing irradiation (IR) can deteriorate the IR-induced secondary reactive metabolic and inflammatory impacts to dose-limiting tissues, such as bone marrow/lymphatic, gastrointestinal tissues, and vascular endothelial tissues, exacerbating the severity of the primary injury and decreasing survival from the exposure. Previously we first reported that ghrelin therapy effectively improved survival by mitigating leukocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, and bone-marrow injury resulting from radiation combined with burn trauma. This study was aimed at investigating whether radiation combined with burn trauma induced the cerebro-vascular impairment and intracranial hemorrhage that could be reversed by ghrelin therapy. When B6D2F1 female mice were exposed to 9.5 Gy Cobalt-60 γ-radiation followed by 15% total skin surface burn, cerebro-vascular impairment and intracranial hemorrhage as well as platelet depletion were observed. Ghrelin treatment after irradiation combined with burn trauma significantly decreased platelet depletion and brain hemorrhage. The results suggest that ghrelin treatment is an effective therapy for ionizing radiation combined with burn trauma. View Full-Text
Keywords: animal model; mouse; ghrelin; radiation; burn; brain; hemorrhage; platelet animal model; mouse; ghrelin; radiation; burn; brain; hemorrhage; platelet
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gorbunov, N.V.; Kiang, J.G. Ghrelin Therapy Decreases Incidents of Intracranial Hemorrhage in Mice after Whole-Body Ionizing Irradiation Combined with Burn Trauma. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18, 1693.

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