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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(2), 276; doi:10.3390/ijms18020276

Development and Long-Term Stability of a Novel Microbial Fuel Cell BOD Sensor with MnO2 Catalyst

1
Centre for Water Research, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore, Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117580, Singapore
2
Key Laboratory of Flexible Electronics (KLOFE), Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing Tech University (NanjingTech), Nanjing 211816, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Deepak Pant
Received: 31 October 2016 / Revised: 23 January 2017 / Accepted: 25 January 2017 / Published: 28 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioelectrochemical Systems)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1425 KB, uploaded 6 February 2017]   |  

Abstract

A novel microbial fuel cell (MFC)-based biosensor was designed for continuous monitoring of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in real wastewater. To lower the material cost, manganese dioxide (MnO2) was tested as an innovative cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction in a single chamber air-cathode MFC, and two different crystalline structures obtained during synthesis of MnO2 (namely β- and γ-MnO2) were compared. The BOD sensor was studied in a comprehensive way, using both sodium acetate solution and real domestic wastewater (DWW). The optimal performance of the sensor was obtained with a β-MnO2 catalyst, with R2 values of 0.99 and 0.98 using sodium acetate solution and DWW, respectively. The BOD values predicted by the β-MnO2 biosensor for DWW were in agreement with the BOD5 values, determined according to standard methods, with slight variations in the range from 3% to 12%. Finally, the long-term stability of the BOD biosensor was evaluated over 1.5 years. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an MFC BOD sensor using an MnO2 catalyst at the cathode; the feasibility of using a low-cost catalyst in an MFC for online measurement of BOD in real wastewater broadens the scope of applications for such devices. View Full-Text
Keywords: microbial fuel cell; manganese dioxide; cathode; biochemical oxygen demand; biosensor; wastewater microbial fuel cell; manganese dioxide; cathode; biochemical oxygen demand; biosensor; wastewater
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Kharkwal, S.; Tan, Y.C.; Lu, M.; Ng, H.Y. Development and Long-Term Stability of a Novel Microbial Fuel Cell BOD Sensor with MnO2 Catalyst. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18, 276.

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