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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(3), 384; doi:10.3390/ijms17030384

Overexpression of G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 in Adipose Tissue of Transgenic Quail Inhibits Lipolysis Associated with Egg Laying

1
Department of Animal Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
2
Department of Animal Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Sangju 742-711, Korea
3
Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Sangju 742-711, Korea
4
Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921, Korea
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ritva Tikkanen
Received: 15 February 2016 / Revised: 8 March 2016 / Accepted: 10 March 2016 / Published: 15 March 2016
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Abstract

In avians, yolk synthesis is regulated by incorporation of portomicrons from the diet, transport of lipoproteins from the liver, and release of lipids from adipose tissue; however, the extent to which lipolysis in adipose tissue contributes to yolk synthesis and egg production has yet to be elucidated. G0/G1 switch gene 2 (G0S2) is known to bind and inhibit adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the rate-limiting enzyme in lipolysis. The objective of this study was to determine whether overexpression of the G0S2 gene in adipose tissue could successfully inhibit endogenous ATGL activity associated with egg laying. Two independent lines of transgenic quail overexpressing G0S2 had delayed onset of egg production and reduced number of eggs over a six-week period compared to non-transgenic quail. Although no differences in measured parameters were observed at the pre-laying stage (5 weeks of age), G0S2 transgenic quail had significantly larger interclavicular fat pad weights and adipocyte sizes and lower NEFA concentrations in the serum at early (1 week after laying first egg) and active laying (5 weeks after laying first egg) stages. Overexpression of G0S2 inhibited lipolysis during early and active laying, which drastically shifted the balance towards a net accumulation of triacylglycerols and increased adipose tissue mass. Thereby, egg production was negatively affected as less triacylglycerols were catabolized to produce lipids for the yolk. View Full-Text
Keywords: G0/G1 switch gene 2; adipose triglyceride lipase; lipolysis; transgenic; Japanese quail G0/G1 switch gene 2; adipose triglyceride lipase; lipolysis; transgenic; Japanese quail
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Chen, P.R.; Shin, S.; Choi, Y.M.; Kim, E.; Han, J.Y.; Lee, K. Overexpression of G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 in Adipose Tissue of Transgenic Quail Inhibits Lipolysis Associated with Egg Laying. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 384.

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