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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(12), 2144; doi:10.3390/ijms17122144

Apoptosis in Cellular Society: Communication between Apoptotic Cells and Their Neighbors

1
Laboratory for Histogenetic Dynamics, Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Nara 630-0192, Japan
2
Laboratory for Histogenetic Dynamics, RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, Kobe 650-0047, Japan
3
Laboratory for Histogenetic Dynamics, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578, Japan
4
Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Anthony Lemarié
Received: 2 November 2016 / Revised: 7 December 2016 / Accepted: 15 December 2016 / Published: 20 December 2016
(This article belongs to the Collection Programmed Cell Death and Apoptosis)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1370 KB, uploaded 20 December 2016]   |  

Abstract

Apoptosis is one of the cell-intrinsic suicide programs and is an essential cellular behavior for animal development and homeostasis. Traditionally, apoptosis has been regarded as a cell-autonomous phenomenon. However, recent in vivo genetic studies have revealed that apoptotic cells actively influence the behaviors of surrounding cells, including engulfment, proliferation, and production of mechanical forces. Such interactions can be bidirectional, and apoptosis is non-autonomously induced in a cellular community. Of note, it is becoming evident that active communication between apoptotic cells and living cells contributes to physiological processes during tissue remodeling, regeneration, and morphogenesis. In this review, we focus on the mutual interactions between apoptotic cells and their neighbors in cellular society and discuss issues relevant to future studies of apoptosis. View Full-Text
Keywords: apoptosis; non-cell autonomous effects; engulfment; proliferation; mechanical force apoptosis; non-cell autonomous effects; engulfment; proliferation; mechanical force
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Kawamoto, Y.; Nakajima, Y.-I.; Kuranaga, E. Apoptosis in Cellular Society: Communication between Apoptotic Cells and Their Neighbors. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 2144.

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