Next Article in Journal
Altered Episodic Memory in Introverted Young Adults Carrying the BDNFMet Allele
Next Article in Special Issue
Metabolomics, a Powerful Tool for Agricultural Research
Previous Article in Journal
Generation and Characterisation of a Reference Transcriptome for Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Bidirectional Estrogen-Like Effects of Genistein on Murine Experimental Autoimmune Ovarian Disease
Article Menu
Issue 11 (November) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1889; doi:10.3390/ijms17111889

Unsaturated Lipids Change in Olive Tree Drupe and Seed during Fruit Development and in Response to Cold-Stress and Acclimation

Dipartimento di Biologia Ambientale, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Roma, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: David Arráez-Román and Vito Verardo
Received: 27 July 2016 / Revised: 7 November 2016 / Accepted: 9 November 2016 / Published: 12 November 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipidomics and Glycomics: New Advances in Food Science and Nutrition)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2242 KB, uploaded 12 November 2016]   |  

Abstract

The olive tree is a plant of economic value for the oil of its drupe. It is a cultigen complex composed of genotypes with differences in cold-hardiness. About 90% of the oil is stored in oil bodies (OBs) in the drupe during the oleogenic phase. Phenols and lipids contribute to oil quality, but the unsaturated fatty acid (FA) fraction is emerging as the most important for quality, because of the very high content in oleic acid, the presence of ω6-linoleic acid and ω3-linolenic acid, and the very low saturated FA content. Another 10% of oil is produced by the seed. Differences in unsaturated FA-enriched lipids exist among seed coat, endosperm, and embryo. Olive oil quality is also affected by the environmental conditions during fruit growth and genotype peculiarities. Production of linoleic and α-linolenic acids, fruit growth, fruit and leaf responses to low temperatures, including cuticle formation, and cold-acclimation are related processes. The levels of unsaturated FAs are changed by FA-desaturase (FAD) activities, involving the functioning of chloroplasts and endoplasmic reticulum. Cold induces lipid changes during drupe and seed development, affecting FADs, but its effect is related to the genotype capability to acclimate to the cold. View Full-Text
Keywords: cold response; cuticle; fatty acid desaturases; fruit development; linoleic acid; linolenic acid; oil composition; olive tree; seed cold response; cuticle; fatty acid desaturases; fruit development; linoleic acid; linolenic acid; oil composition; olive tree; seed
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

D’Angeli, S.; Altamura, M.M. Unsaturated Lipids Change in Olive Tree Drupe and Seed during Fruit Development and in Response to Cold-Stress and Acclimation. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 1889.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Mol. Sci. EISSN 1422-0067 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top