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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(10), 1671; doi:10.3390/ijms17101671

Interactions of β-Conglycinin (7S) with Different Phenolic Acids—Impact on Structural Characteristics and Proteolytic Degradation of Proteins

1
Beijing Key Laboratory of Functional Food from Plant Resources, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
2
Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences, Enzyme Laboratory, Tsukuba 305-8686, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Tatyana Karabencheva-Christova and Christo Z. Christov
Received: 3 August 2016 / Revised: 9 September 2016 / Accepted: 22 September 2016 / Published: 2 October 2016
(This article belongs to the Collection Proteins and Protein-Ligand Interactions)
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Abstract

p-Coumalic acid (PCA), caffeic acid (CA), gallic acid (GA) and chlorogenic acid (CGA) are the major phenolic acids that co-exist with soy protein components in foodstuffs. Surprisingly, there are only a handful of reports that describe their interaction with β-Conglycinin (7S), a major soy protein. In this report, we investigated the interaction between phenolic acids and soy protein 7S and observed an interaction between each of these phenolic acids and soy protein 7S, which was carried out by binding. Further analysis revealed that the binding activity of the phenolic acids was structure dependent. Here, the binding affinity of CA and GA towards 7S was found to be stronger than that of PCA, because CA and GA have one more hydroxyl group. Interestingly, the binding of phenolic acids with soy protein 7S did not affect protein digestion by pepsin and trypsin. These findings aid our understanding of the relationship between different phenolic acids and proteins in complex food systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: p-coumalic acid; caffeic acid; gallic acid; chlorogenic acid; β-Conglycinin; 7S; interaction p-coumalic acid; caffeic acid; gallic acid; chlorogenic acid; β-Conglycinin; 7S; interaction
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Gan, J.; Chen, H.; Liu, J.; Wang, Y.; Nirasawa, S.; Cheng, Y. Interactions of β-Conglycinin (7S) with Different Phenolic Acids—Impact on Structural Characteristics and Proteolytic Degradation of Proteins. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17, 1671.

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