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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16(11), 26395-26405; doi:10.3390/ijms161125965

Accumulation and Phosphorylation of RecQ-Mediated Genome Instability Protein 1 (RMI1) at Serine 284 and Serine 292 during Mitosis

1,†
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1,†
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1
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1
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1
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1
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1,* and 2,*
1
Tianjin Key Laboratory of Radiation Medicine and Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300192, China
2
Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alan C. Leonard
Received: 15 September 2015 / Revised: 22 October 2015 / Accepted: 26 October 2015 / Published: 4 November 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Machinery of Cell Growth Regulation)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [861 KB, uploaded 4 November 2015]   |  

Abstract

Chromosome instability usually leads to tumorigenesis. Bloom syndrome (BS) is a genetic disease associated with chromosome instability. The BS gene product, BLM, has been reported to function in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) to prevent chromosome instability. BTR complex, composed of BLM, topoisomerase IIIα (Topo IIIα), RMI1 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 1, BLAP75) and RMI2 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 2, BLAP18), is crucial for maintaining genome stability. Recent work has demonstrated that RMI2 also plays critical role in SAC. However, little is know about RMI1 regulation during the cell cycle. Here we present that RMI1 protein level does not change through G1, S and G2 phases, but significantly increases in M phase. Moreover, phosphorylation of RMI1 occurs in mitosis. Upon microtubule-disturbing agent, RMI1 is phosphorylated primarily at the sites of Serine 284 and Serine 292, which does not interfere with the formation of BTR complex. Additionally, this phosphorylation is partially reversed by roscovitine treatment, implying cycling-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) might be one of the upstream kinases. View Full-Text
Keywords: RMI1 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 1); BTR (BLM-Topo IIIα-RMI) complex; mitosis; phosphorylation RMI1 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 1); BTR (BLM-Topo IIIα-RMI) complex; mitosis; phosphorylation
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Xu, C.; Wang, Y.; Wang, L.; Wang, Q.; Du, L.-Q.; Fan, S.; Liu, Q.; Li, L. Accumulation and Phosphorylation of RecQ-Mediated Genome Instability Protein 1 (RMI1) at Serine 284 and Serine 292 during Mitosis. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16, 26395-26405.

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