Next Article in Journal
Synthesis and Evaluation of New Pyrazoline Derivatives as Potential Anticancer Agents in HepG-2 Cell Line
Next Article in Special Issue
Harnessing Solute Carrier Transporters for Precision Oncology
Previous Article in Journal
A Flavone Constituent from Myoporum bontioides Induces M-Phase Cell Cycle Arrest of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells
Previous Article in Special Issue
How Open Data Shapes In Silico Transporter Modeling
Article Menu
Issue 3 (March) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Molecules 2017, 22(3), 468; doi:10.3390/molecules22030468

New Roads Leading to Old Destinations: Efflux Pumps as Targets to Reverse Multidrug Resistance in Bacteria

1
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Szeged, 6720 Szeged, Hungary
2
Travel Medicine, Institute of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 1349-008 Lisbon, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Maria Emília de Sousa
Received: 30 January 2017 / Revised: 9 March 2017 / Accepted: 10 March 2017 / Published: 15 March 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Can Membrane Transporters Contribute to Drug Discovery?)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1379 KB, uploaded 15 March 2017]   |  

Abstract

Multidrug resistance (MDR) has appeared in response to selective pressures resulting from the incorrect use of antibiotics and other antimicrobials. This inappropriate application and mismanagement of antibiotics have led to serious problems in the therapy of infectious diseases. Bacteria can develop resistance by various mechanisms and one of the most important factors resulting in MDR is efflux pump-mediated resistance. Because of the importance of the efflux-related multidrug resistance the development of new therapeutic approaches aiming to inhibit bacterial efflux pumps is a promising way to combat bacteria having over-expressed MDR efflux systems. The definition of an efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) includes the ability to render the bacterium increasingly more sensitive to a given antibiotic or even reverse the multidrug resistant phenotype. In the recent years numerous EPIs have been developed, although so far their clinical application has not yet been achieved due to their in vivo toxicity and side effects. In this review, we aim to give a short overview of efflux mediated resistance in bacteria, EPI compounds of plant and synthetic origin, and the possible methods to investigate and screen EPI compounds in bacterial systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: multidrug resistance; multidrug efflux pump; efflux pump inhibitor (EPI); proton motive force; RND pump; ABC-transporter multidrug resistance; multidrug efflux pump; efflux pump inhibitor (EPI); proton motive force; RND pump; ABC-transporter
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Spengler, G.; Kincses, A.; Gajdács, M.; Amaral, L. New Roads Leading to Old Destinations: Efflux Pumps as Targets to Reverse Multidrug Resistance in Bacteria. Molecules 2017, 22, 468.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]

Molecules EISSN 1420-3049 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top