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Retraction published on 7 November 2016, see Molecules 2016, 21(11), 1463.

Open AccessArticle
Molecules 2016, 21(5), 594; doi:10.3390/molecules21050594

The Aminopyridinol Derivative BJ-1201 Protects Murine Hippocampal Cells against Glutamate-Induced Neurotoxicity via Heme Oxygenase-1

1
College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, Dong-gu, Gwangju 61452, Korea
2
Department of Pharmacy, Hanyang University, Ansan 15588, Korea
3
College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 38541, Korea
4
College of Pharmacy, Keimyung University, Daegu 42601, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Peter Koulen
Received: 9 March 2016 / Revised: 26 April 2016 / Accepted: 2 May 2016 / Published: 5 May 2016
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Abstract

Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. It can cause neuronal cell damage in the context of oxidative stress. BJ-1201 is a derivative of the compound aminopyridinol, which is known for its antioxidant activity. In this study, we examined the effect of BJ-1201, a 6-(diphenylamino)-2,4,5-trimethylpyridin-3-ol compound, on neuroprotection in HT22 cells. Our data showed that BJ-1201 can protect HT22 cells against glutamate-induced cell cytotoxicity. In addition, BJ-1201 upregulated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) to levels comparable to those of the CoPP-treated group. BJ-1201 treatment induced phosphorylation of JNK, but not p38-MAPK or ERK. It also increased the signal in the reporter assay based on β-galactosidase activity driven by the nuclear transcription factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) promoter harboring antioxidant response elements (AREs) and induced the translocation of Nrf2. These results demonstrate that BJ-1201 may be a good therapeutic platform against neurodegenerative diseases induced by oxidative stress. View Full-Text
Keywords: aminopyridinol compound BJ-1201; neuroprotection; aminopyridinol HT22; heme oxygenase-1; nuclear transcription factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 aminopyridinol compound BJ-1201; neuroprotection; aminopyridinol HT22; heme oxygenase-1; nuclear transcription factor erythroid-2 related factor 2
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Lee, D.-S.; Nam, T.-G.; Jeong, B.-S.; Jeong, G.-S. The Aminopyridinol Derivative BJ-1201 Protects Murine Hippocampal Cells against Glutamate-Induced Neurotoxicity via Heme Oxygenase-1. Molecules 2016, 21, 594.

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