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Molecules 2015, 20(12), 21067-21081; doi:10.3390/molecules201219746

Technological Application of Maltodextrins According to the Degree of Polymerization

1
Academic Coordination, Altiplano Region, Autonomous University of San Luis Potosi, Road Cedral km. 5+600, 78700 Matehuala, San Luis Potosi, Mexico
2
Advanced Materials Research Center (CIMAV), Alianza Norte 202, Research and Technological Innovation Park (PIIT), 66600 Apodaca, Nuevo Leon, Mexico
3
Doctorate Institutional in Engineering and Materials Science (DICIM), Sierra Leona 530, Lomas, 2nd. Section, 78210 San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, Mexico
4
Faculty of Chemistry Sciences, Autonomous University of San Luis Potosi, Manuel Nava 6, 78290 San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Derek J. McPhee
Received: 24 October 2015 / Revised: 17 November 2015 / Accepted: 19 November 2015 / Published: 27 November 2015
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Diversity)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2225 KB, uploaded 27 November 2015]   |  

Abstract

Maltodextrin (MX) is an ingredient in high demand in the food industry, mainly for its useful physical properties which depend on the dextrose equivalent (DE). The DE has however been shown to be an inaccurate parameter for predicting the performance of the MXs in technological applications, hence commercial MXs were characterized by mass spectrometry (MS) to determine their molecular weight distribution (MWD) and degree of polymerization (DP). Samples were subjected to different water activities (aw). Water adsorption was similar at low aw, but radically increased with the DP at higher aw. The decomposition temperature (Td) showed some variations attributed to the thermal hydrolysis induced by the large amount of adsorbed water and the supplied heat. The glass transition temperature (Tg) linearly decreased with both, aw and DP. The microstructural analysis by X-ray diffraction showed that MXs did not crystallize with the adsorption of water, preserving their amorphous structure. The optical micrographs showed radical changes in the overall appearance of the MXs, indicating a transition from a glassy to a rubbery state. Based on these characterizations, different technological applications for the MXs were suggested. View Full-Text
Keywords: maltodextrins; degree of polymerization; water activity; glass transition temperature; overall appearance; technological application maltodextrins; degree of polymerization; water activity; glass transition temperature; overall appearance; technological application
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Saavedra-Leos, Z.; Leyva-Porras, C.; Araujo-Díaz, S.B.; Toxqui-Terán, A.; Borrás-Enríquez, A.J. Technological Application of Maltodextrins According to the Degree of Polymerization. Molecules 2015, 20, 21067-21081.

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