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Molecules 2014, 19(11), 17897-17925; doi:10.3390/molecules191117897

Spectrum-Effect Relationships as a Systematic Approach to Traditional Chinese Medicine Research: Current Status and Future Perspectives

1
School of Chinese Pharmacy, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100102, China
2
Pharmacy College, Ningxia Medical University, Ningxia 750000, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 5 September 2014 / Revised: 27 October 2014 / Accepted: 29 October 2014 / Published: 4 November 2014
(This article belongs to the Section Natural Products)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [491 KB, uploaded 4 November 2014]   |  

Abstract

Component fingerprints are a recognized method used worldwide to evaluate the quality of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). To foster the strengths and circumvent the weaknesses of the fingerprint technique in TCM, spectrum-effect relationships would complementarily clarify the nature of pharmacodynamic effects in the practice of TCM. The application of the spectrum-effect relationship method is crucial for understanding and interpreting TCM development, especially in the view of the trends towards TCM modernization and standardization. The basic requirement for using this method is in-depth knowledge of the active material basis and mechanisms of action. It is a novel and effective approach to study TCMs and great progress has been made, but to make it more accurate for TCM research purposes, more efforts are needed. In this review, the authors summarize the current knowledge about the spectrum-effect relationship method, including the fingerprint methods, pharmacodynamics studies and the methods of establishing relationships between the fingerprints and pharmacodynamics. Some speculation regarding future perspectives for spectrum-effect relationship approaches in TCM modernization and standardization are also proposed. View Full-Text
Keywords: spectrum-effect relationships; traditional Chinese medicine; Chinese herbal formulas; fingerprints; drug-containing serum spectrum-effect relationships; traditional Chinese medicine; Chinese herbal formulas; fingerprints; drug-containing serum
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Xu, G.-L.; Xie, M.; Yang, X.-Y.; Song, Y.; Yan, C.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, X.; Liu, Z.-Z.; Tian, Y.-X.; Wang, Y.; Jiang, R.; Liu, W.-R.; Wang, X.-H.; She, G.-M. Spectrum-Effect Relationships as a Systematic Approach to Traditional Chinese Medicine Research: Current Status and Future Perspectives. Molecules 2014, 19, 17897-17925.

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