Next Issue
Previous Issue

E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Table of Contents

Entropy, Volume 12, Issue 11 (November 2010), Pages 2244-2358

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle All in Action
Entropy 2010, 12(11), 2333-2358; doi:10.3390/e12112333
Received: 8 October 2010 / Revised: 26 October 2010 / Accepted: 26 October 2010 / Published: 19 November 2010
Cited by 40 | PDF Full-text (671 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The principle of least action provides a holistic worldview in which Nature in its entirety and every detail is described in terms of actions. Each and every action is ultimately composed of one or multiple of the most elementary actions which relates [...] Read more.
The principle of least action provides a holistic worldview in which Nature in its entirety and every detail is described in terms of actions. Each and every action is ultimately composed of one or multiple of the most elementary actions which relates to Planck’s constant. Elements of space are closed actions, known as fermions, whereas elements of time are open actions, known as bosons. The actions span an energy landscape, the Universe, which evolves irreversibly according to the 2nd law of thermodynamics by diminishing energy density differences in least time. During evolution densely-curled actions unfold step-by-step when opening up and expelling one or multiple elementary actions to their surrounding sparser space. The energy landscape will process from one symmetry group to another until the equivalence to its dual, i.e., the surrounding density has been attained. The scale-free physical portrayal of nature in terms of actions does not recognize any fundamental difference between fundamental particles and fundamental forces. Instead a plethora of particles and a diaspora of forces are perceived merely as diverse manifestations of a natural selection for various mechanisms and ways to decrease free energy in the least time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Thermodynamics)
Figures

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Entanglement Entropy of AdS Black Holes
Entropy 2010, 12(11), 2244-2267; doi:10.3390/e12112244
Received: 25 September 2010 / Accepted: 13 October 2010 / Published: 2 November 2010
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (379 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We review recent progress in understanding the entanglement entropy of gravitational configurations for anti-de Sitter gravity in two and three spacetime dimensions using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We derive simple expressions for the entanglement entropy of two- and three-dimensional black holes. In both [...] Read more.
We review recent progress in understanding the entanglement entropy of gravitational configurations for anti-de Sitter gravity in two and three spacetime dimensions using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We derive simple expressions for the entanglement entropy of two- and three-dimensional black holes. In both cases, the leading term of the entanglement entropy in the large black hole mass expansion reproduces exactly the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, whereas the subleading term behaves logarithmically. In particular, for the BTZ black hole the leading term of the entanglement entropy can be obtained from the large temperature expansion of the partition function of a broad class of 2D CFTs on the torus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entropy in Quantum Gravity)
Open AccessReview Using Quantum Computers for Quantum Simulation
Entropy 2010, 12(11), 2268-2307; doi:10.3390/e12112268
Received: 2 October 2010 / Revised: 2 November 2010 / Accepted: 10 November 2010 / Published: 15 November 2010
Cited by 30 | PDF Full-text (226 KB)
Abstract
Numerical simulation of quantum systems is crucial to further our understanding of natural phenomena. Many systems of key interest and importance, in areas such as superconducting materials and quantum chemistry, are thought to be described by models which we cannot solve with [...] Read more.
Numerical simulation of quantum systems is crucial to further our understanding of natural phenomena. Many systems of key interest and importance, in areas such as superconducting materials and quantum chemistry, are thought to be described by models which we cannot solve with sufficient accuracy, neither analytically nor numerically with classical computers. Using a quantum computer to simulate such quantum systems has been viewed as a key application of quantum computation from the very beginning of the field in the 1980s. Moreover, useful results beyond the reach of classical computation are expected to be accessible with fewer than a hundred qubits, making quantum simulation potentially one of the earliest practical applications of quantum computers. In this paper we survey the theoretical and experimental development of quantum simulation using quantum computers, from the first ideas to the intense research efforts currently underway. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quantum Information)
Figures

Open AccessReview Autonomously Moving Colloidal Objects that Resemble Living Matter
Entropy 2010, 12(11), 2308-2332; doi:10.3390/e12112308
Received: 25 September 2010 / Revised: 19 October 2010 / Accepted: 7 November 2010 / Published: 16 November 2010
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (591 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The design of autonomously moving objects that resemble living matter is an excellent research topic that may develop into various applications of functional motion. Autonomous motion can demonstrate numerous significant characteristics such as transduction of chemical potential into work without heat, chemosensitive [...] Read more.
The design of autonomously moving objects that resemble living matter is an excellent research topic that may develop into various applications of functional motion. Autonomous motion can demonstrate numerous significant characteristics such as transduction of chemical potential into work without heat, chemosensitive motion, chemotactic and phototactic motions, and pulse-like motion with periodicities responding to the chemical environment. Sustainable motion can be realized with an open system that exchanges heat and matter across its interface. Hence the autonomously moving object has a colloidal scale with a large specific area. This article reviews several examples of systems with such characteristics that have been studied, focusing on chemical systems containing amphiphilic molecules. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emergence in Chemical Systems)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Entropy Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
entropy@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Entropy
Back to Top